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Archive for March, 2010

GroupSeven spending benchmarks are used to help university campuses evaluate IT services. By benchmarking against institutions with similar missions, IT leaders can gain insights into how to best optimize these investments.

Benchmark #1 – Budget Profile [shows how IT dollars are allocated across institutional budget classifications]
Benchmark #2 – Budget Support Level [IT dollars are normalized for institutional size]
Benchmark #3 – Budget Impact [ratio of IT budget to total institution budget]
Benchmark #4 – People Supported per IT Staff
Benchmark #5 – Computers Supported per IT Staff
Benchmark #6 – Staffing Profile Per Service Area
Benchmark #7 – Computer Availability

This article shows actual benchmark results in these areas. Compiled by David Smallen and Karen Leach at Hamilton College. Published in Educause Quarterly in November 2002. The article can be found:

http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/eqm0234.pdf

This report was followed up by a 32 page paper entitled “INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BENCHMARKS: A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY PRESIDENTS” (written by Smallen and Leach) which was published by the Council of Independent Colleges in June 2004. This report contains more data and a more complete explanation of the benchmarks. The paper can be found:

http://www.cic.edu/publications/books_reports/IT_paper.pdf

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PatentsCan you believe this?  In 2006 as United States Patent (7020621) was issued with the following purpose:

A method for determining the total cost incurred per user of information technology (IT) in a distributed computing environment includes obtaining base costs and ongoing costs of an IT system and applying those costs to a series of metrics. The metrics are compared against benchmarks to evaluate and assess where cost efficiencies can be achieved.

In one embodiment, the invention includes a method for determining the cost per user of an information technology system. The method includes obtaining base costs, ongoing direct costs, and ongoing indirect costs. The method further includes gathering information relating to user profiles and organizational characteristics. These costs and information are input into a computer program to determine the cost for each user.

Full information can be found: http://www.google.com/patents?hl=en&lr=&vid=USPAT7020621&id=JU54AAAAEBAJ&oi=fnd&dq=7020621&printsec=abstract#v=onepage&q=&f=false

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